Three Things Thursday

Thanks to Nerd in the Brain for the weekly challenge Three Things Thursday:

three things that make me smile: an exercise in gratitude – feel free to steal this idea with wild abandon and fill your blog with the happy

Three Things Thursday

Women’s March on Washington: Washington State, Olympia
January 21, 2017

My daughter and I went down to the state capital to march last Saturday. We didn’t take any signs of our own, but I’m always envious of other peoples’ creativity.

Here are three that amused me.

(Click on any photo to see a larger version.)

 

© 2017 by Mary Daniels Brown

Three Things Thursday

Thanks to Nerd in the Brain for the weekly challenge Three Things Thursday:

three things that make me smile: an exercise in gratitude – feel free to steal this idea with wild abandon and fill your blog with the happy

Three Things Thursday

We’ve been retired in Tacoma, WA, for almost four years now, and I still enjoy learning about my new hometown. Here are three discoveries from the past week:

(1) A new-to-Seattle reading list, part 2: The nonfiction edition

Last week I included a reading list of local fiction. Here is the nonfiction companion.

(2) “Those Other Huskies”

I wrote about the University of Connecticut Huskies and the University of Washington Huskies in a Three Things Thursday post last year.

I was pleased to see this recent article, in which the giant East Coast newspaper the New York Times reported on “those other Huskies,” the ones that live near me:

Washington Women Paint a Target on Those Other Huskies

(3) A bit of local history

Tuesday was the anniversary of one of Tacoma’s most iconic events, the 1993 demolition of the ASARCO smelter smokestack:

The ASARCO smokestack — once the world’s largest — is demolished at the company’s old copper smelter in Ruston, north of Tacoma, on January 17, 1993.

Of course I had heard about this event before, but notice of this anniversary made me search for more information. And I found a lot:

{Feature photo at top of post from Toxipedia}

Have a good week, everyone!

 

© 2017 by Mary Daniels Brown

Three Things Thursday

Thanks to Nerd in the Brain for the weekly challenge Three Things Thursday:

three things that make me smile: an exercise in gratitude – feel free to steal this idea with wild abandon and fill your blog with the happy

Three Things Thursday

Here are three things that warmed my heart recently.

(1) A new-to-Seattle reading list: the fiction essentials

We moved to Tacoma, about 25 miles south of Seattle, just a little under four years ago. I always love finding out new things about where we now live, and I also love reading, especially fiction. So I was pleased to come across this list of books that will introduce me to the region. There are enough suggestions here to keep me happily reading throughout 2017.

(2) Creative Colloquy: A Literary Site

I’m determined that 2017 will be my year to work on my personal writing. This site was a real find:

Creative Colloquy was founded in February of 2014 with the intention of fostering relationships built upon the mutual admiration of the written word and providing a platform to highlight literary talent in the South Sound.

We do this in a number of ways including the online literary site focused on short fiction, novel excerpts and essays but also including poetry and other prose penned by writers who reside in the Pacific Northwest.

South Sound refers to the area around Puget Sound south of Seattle. This organization holds monthly events in Tacoma. I had been looking for a local writers group. Perhaps this will be it.

(3) Inside Bright Lights, the Final Curtain for Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher

Who wasn’t touched by the recent deaths, just one day apart, of Carrie Fisher and her mother, Debbie Reynolds? HBO had completed a documentary on the famous duo scheduled to premier later in the year, but the network moved the date up to January 7.

In this article, “Documentarians Alexis Bloom and Fisher Stevens talk their moving documentary, which gains a bittersweet new meaning in the wake of Reynolds’s and Fisher’s unexpected deaths.”

I hope all of you will have a fantastic week.

© 2017 by Mary Daniels Brown

Three Things Thursday

Thanks to Nerd in the Brain for the weekly challenge Three Things Thursday:

three things that make me smile: an exercise in gratitude – feel free to steal this idea with wild abandon and fill your blog with the happy

Three Things Thursday

I’ve been gone for quite a while, probably about three months. Life happens. I’ve missed the weekly Three Things Thursday posts, since they usually brighten my spirit and bring a smile to my face. I’m glad to be back.

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Zoolights

Every year the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium here in Tacoma dresses up for the winter with Zoolights, a gorgeous and enchanting other world painted by thousands of colored lights. Here are three of the best photos from this year’s visit.

(1) Dancing Crab

crab

Since this is a static photograph, you can’t see this as the dancing crab that it really was, with its claws alternately opening and closing. But I’m still fond of it.

(2) Tree of Life

tree of life

I’m not sure who named this the tree of life or why it was so named, but if I had to pick one overall favorite display, this would be it. Perhaps I love it so much because purple is my favorite color. Whatever the reason, this is the centerpiece that draws me every year.

(3) Wolf Howling at the Moon

wolf howling at moon

The Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium participates in the red wolf restoration project, and this annual display illustrates that participation. In past years we had to photograph this display from quite far away, and the pictures always came out blurred. But this year some of the traditional exhibits had been rearranged on the grounds. We were able to get much closer to the howling wolf, and this photo came out better than previous attempts.

I hope Zoolights brightens up your day as much as it brightened up my night.

 

© 2017 by Mary Daniels Brown

Three Things Thursday

Thanks to Nerd in the Brain for the weekly challenge Three Things Thursday:

three things that make me smile: an exercise in gratitude – feel free to steal this idea with wild abandon and fill your blog with the happy

Three Things Thursday

I Love Fall!

Most people think of January 1st as the start of the new year, but fall has always signified the new year for me. Perhaps this is because, as a kid, I couldn’t wait to go back to school. I think this is why I love fall so much, even after being out of school for many, many years.

However, over my adult years I’ve discovered additional reasons for loving the return of fall weather. Here are three of them.

(Click on any photo to see a larger version.)

(1) Rutting Season

After many visits to Northwest Trek, I know that fall is rutting season for deer, moose, caribou, and elk. I’ve written before about the many deer who roam through our neighborhood. Most of them are females, but recently this young buck dropped by. This is the time of year when the males rub the soft velvet off of their antlers to get to the harder substance underneath that will allow them to spar with other males to assert their dominance. This young man used a bush in our back yard for that purpose.

rutting deer

After he finished rubbing his antlers against the bush, he urinated to mark his territory. He probably didn’t need to do that because we haven’t seen any other males around. But wait—maybe the reason we haven’t seen any other bucks is that he has marked his territory and the others are therefore avoiding our back yard.

(2) This!

pumpkin spice coffee

(3) Playoff Baseball

I grew up a baseball fan, and for a true fan the World Series is ultimate baseball. It used to be that, shortly after the regular season ended, the teams with the best record in the National League and the American League battled each other in the World Series to claim the title of champion. Over the years that process has been expanded, and now there are wild-card play-in games followed by two league division series finally followed by the World Series. Baseball doesn’t get any better than this!

Red Sox logoI was a Boston Red Sox fan for the first 22 years of my life. Then we lived in St. Louis for 42 years, where I of course became a Cardinals fan. Now that we’ve moved to Tacoma, WA, I’m proud to be a fan of my new home town team, the Seattle Mariners. Some years at this time my loyalties are sorely tested of two of these three teams face off. But this year the only one of my teams that made the postseason is the Red Sox, so I can unequivocally root for them throughout.

Play ball!

 

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown

Three Things Thursday: Discover the Dinosaurs

Thanks to Nerd in the Brain for the weekly challenge Three Things Thursday:

three things that make me smile: an exercise in gratitude – feel free to steal this idea with wild abandon and fill your blog with the happy

Three Things Thursday

Discover the Dinosaurs

Recently a group of us from Franke Tobey Jones spent the day at the Washington State Fair. Last week I featured three things that amused me. This week I feature three giants from the exhibit Discover the Dinosaurs.

(Click on any photo to see a larger version.)

(1) Allosaurus

Allosaurus
Allosaurus

Allosaurus, meaning Different Lizard, was a powerful predator that walked on two powerful legs, had a strong, S-shaped neck, and had vertebrae that were different from those of other dinosaurs (hence its name).

Allosaurus was 28 feet long and 16 feet high. It weighed 1,500–2,500 pounds and ate meat.

(2) Struthiomimus

Struthiomimus
Struthiomimus

As with other ornithomimids, Struthiomimus had a small, slender head on a long neck. Its tail was probably used for balance when running at high speeds of 30–50 mph. It had a straight-edged beak which has lead to suspicion that this dinosaur was an omnivore.

Struthiomimus was 14 feet long and 5 feet high. It weighed about 330 pounds and perhaps ate both meat and plants.

(3) Dilophosaurus

Dilophosaurus
Dilophosaurus

There is no evidence to support Dilophosaurus could spit, or that it had a neck frill, as seen in Jurassic Park.

After the model was made for this exhibit, new scientific evidence came to light strongly suggesting that Dilophosaurus did not have a neck frill. It was too late to remake the exhibit, but the signage included the update.

Dilophosaurus was 20 feet long and 5 feet high. It weighed 650–1,000 pounds.

 

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown

Three Things Thursday

Thanks to Nerd in the Brain for the weekly challenge Three Things Thursday:

three things that make me smile: an exercise in gratitude – feel free to steal this idea with wild abandon and fill your blog with the happy

Three Things Thursday

A Day at the Fair

Recently a group of us from Franke Tobey Jones spent the day at the Washington State Fair. There’s so much to see there that it’s hard to decide what to feature, but here are three things that amused me (click on any photo to see a larger version):

Where do brown eggs come from?
Where do brown eggs come from?

 

magic hands
magic hands

 

bovine wisdom
bovine wisdom

 

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown

Three Things Thursday

9/15

Thanks to Nerd in the Brain for the weekly challenge Three Things Thursday:

three things that make me smile: an exercise in gratitude – feel free to steal this idea with wild abandon and fill your blog with the happy

Three Things Thursday

The Seattle Seahawks opened the 2016 season last Sunday with a heart-stopping come-from-behind victory in the final 44 seconds of the game. Seahawks fans used to call themselves The 12th Man, but a college in Texas apparently has trademark rights on that phrase. Therefore, the correct nomenclature is now The 12. There are big flags sporting a giant 12 on a blue background just about everywhere you look.

People here take their football very seriously, as these photos demonstrate.

Seahawks' fan's car
Seahawks’ fan’s car
Seahawks Hot Sauce
Seahawks Hot Sauce
Kayaks in Seahawks team colors
Kayaks in Seahawks team colors

 

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown

Three Things Thursday

Thanks to Nerd in the Brain for the weekly challenge Three Things Thursday:

three things that make me smile: an exercise in gratitude – feel free to steal this idea with wild abandon and fill your blog with the happy

Three Things Thursday

Last week we took a trip to Victoria, BC, with a group from our retirement community. There’s so much to see and do there, but today I’ll focus on three things that amused me.

(1) I love puns

Boat: Prince of Whales

I make no apology for this personality quirk.

(2) Mountie Moose

Moose Mountie

Royal Canadian Mounted Moose

(3) Piano Alfresco

outdoor piano

On our bus ride along the scenic route, we noticed a couple of pianos in plastic covers along the sidewalk. When we stopped along the way at a photo opportunity, a young man walked over to the nearby piano, unzipped the plastic cover, and sat down and played for a few minutes. Then he rezipped the cover and walked on his way.

Apparently these pianos are set out just so anyone who wants to can stop and play for a while. I’ve never seen anything like this before. What a great idea!

Until next time, I hope everyone has a great week.

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown

Three Things Thursday

Thanks to Nerd in the Brain for the weekly challenge Three Things Thursday:

three things that make me smile: an exercise in gratitude – feel free to steal this idea with wild abandon and fill your blog with the happy

three-things-thursday-badge-new

I have missed several weeks of Three Things Thursday because of a couple of family situations that required drop-everything-and-go travel. I’m glad to be back.

Memories from New England

My husband and I grew up in Connecticut, lived most of our adult lives (42 years) in St. Louis, then retired to Tacoma, WA. The first of our unexpected trips required a return to Connecticut, where I waxed nostalgic over several things emblematic of the region.

(Click on any photo to see a larger version.)

(1) White Birch Trees

white birch trees
white birch trees

These beautiful trees (Betula papyrifera) are all over the wooded areas of New England. I didn’t realize how much I love them until we moved to the midwest, where these trees don’t grow. Their white bark with narrow, horizontal black lines peels off in sheets. The bark is water repellant, and Native Americans used birch bark to build canoes.

I was glad to be reunited with birch trees when we moved to Washington State. Many of the trees here are not as white as those in New England. White barks signifies older trees;  younger trees have light brown bark. Birch is a short-lived species that doesn’t do well in humidity, which may account for the color difference between New England and Pacific Northwest trees. The birch trees here are definitely recognizable, though, and are one of the first natural phenomena I noticed when I moved here.

Also known as paper birch, these trees are among the first to grow after forest fires. They provide winter forage for moose.

(2) Buildings with Several Numbers

Elton Tavern, Burlington, CT, USA; built in 1810
Elton Tavern, Burlington, CT, USA

These plaques are on the Elton Tavern in my hometown of Burlington, CT (shown in the feature image at the top of this post). When I was a kid, the building was a private house. The local lore was that the building was originally an inn where George Washington stopped for the night on his travels. In more recent years the town historical society has bought and refurbished the building, but I haven’t been in town to attend the now annual Tavern Day that features colonial crafts and history. The road on which the building sits has always been called George Washington Turnpike.

Plaques such as these mark buildings all over New England. In many town centers you’ll see houses with a street number on the left of the front door and the date the house was built on the right. New Englanders take their early history quite seriously.

(3) White Clapboard Churches

Burlington Congregational Church, Burlington, CT
Burlington Congregational Church, Burlington, CT

This is the Congregational Church in Burlington, CT, which was founded in 1774. You’ll find a church that looks almost exactly like this one in most New England towns. This is not surprising, since the right to worship as they chose was what brought most early settlers to the area.

© 2016 by Mary Daniels Brown