State Flower: Rhodendrom

rhododendron

 

Here’s what the Washington State website has to say about the official state flower:

State Flower
Coast Rhododendron
In 1892, before they had the right to vote, Washington women selected the coast rhododendron as the state flower. They wanted an official flower to enter in a floral exhibit at the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago. Six flowers were considered, but the final decision was narrowed to clover and the “rhodie,” and voting booths were set up for ladies throughout the state. When the ballots were counted, the rhododendron had been chosen as the Washington state flower. In 1959, the Legislature designated the native species, Rhododendron macrophyllum, as the official flower of the state of Washington.

These flowers are gorgeous, with their huge blooms. Colors include pale pink, magenta, red, salmon, and violet, with different varieties blooming at slightly different times.

Rhododendron bushes are nearly ubiquitous in landscaping around here—so much so that lots of people say they’re sick of seeing them. But I’m still enough of a newcomer that I love to see these bursts of color all over during the spring.

 

When the Grandchildren Grow Older, and Closer – NYTimes.com

When the Grandchildren Grow Older, and Closer – NYTimes.com

Much of the research on grandparents and grandchildren has focused on young children and on the safety-net function that grandparents can provide in troubled families. But lengthening lifespans mean that more people will have adult relationships with their grandparents, too, sometimes for many years.

“We know relatively little about what grandparents and grandchildren do for each other on a daily basis during the grandchildren’s adulthood,” said Sara Moorman, a Boston College sociologist who set out to learn more. She presented the results of her research at the American Sociological Association’s annual meeting in New York this week.

I don’t have any grandchildren, so this is a topic I had not thought about: the relationship between grandparents and adult grandchildren.

Frontline: Life and Death in Assisted Living

Frontline: Life and Death in Assisted Living

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/life-and-death-in-assisted-living/

What can one expect in an assisted living facility? It can be hard to evaluate their seemingly bucolic surroundings based solely on their websites and promotional literature. The team at Frontline teamed up with Pro Publica to craft this well-done documentary on the assisted living industry in the United States. Visitors can watch the entire 53 minute documentary online or explore the site’s wealth of extra features. Users shouldn’t miss the interviews with two of the nation’s largest assisted living companies or the very compelling live chat transcript with the filmmakers, titled Is Assisted Living Safe for Your Parents? Journalists, in particular, will appreciate the section How “Life and Death in Assisted Living” Was Reported.

From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2013. https://www.scout.wisc.edu/

Me, too!

“I am happily living in ‘the other Washington’ where I have a day job that I love,” Amazon founder Jeff Bezos told Washington Post employees after the announcement of his purchase of the newspaper.

Film Review: “Still Mine”

‘Still Mine’ Adds to Movies on Aging

Paula Span reviews this new film:

Not long ago, I could name the really excellent recent movies about aging on one hand. Now I’m running short of fingers, which I hope reflects filmmakers’ dawning recognition of the way this global demographic shift affects all our lives. The latest entry, a Canadian movie called “Still Mine,” opened in New York, Washington, Phoenix and several other cities last month and will arrive in Denver, Atlanta, Seattle, Charlotte and more locations today.

And, just as rain is the standard symbol for Seattle, dementia has become a standard trope for aging:

Interesting, isn’t it, how many of the best films about aging zero in on dementia? On my personal favorites list (adding “Still Mine” to “Amour,” “The Iron Lady,” “Iris,” “The Savages,” “Away from Her” and “About Schmidt”), all but the last incorporate a central character suffering from this disease. Screenwriters, and novelists like Walter Mosley and Alice LaPlante, can’t seem to resist its intrinsic here-but-not-here drama.

“Still Mine” is clear-eyed about this phase, not nearly as brutal as the masterful “Amour,” but more grounded than “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” and “Quartet,” both of which featured charming British actors in fluffy screenplays that carefully evaded most realities of advanced age.

This film doesn’t, but it is gentle, more gentle than life can be.

 

A Dark View of Assisted Living

A Dark View of Assisted Living – NYTimes.com

the hourlong “Frontline” documentary “Life and Death in Assisted Living,” airing Tuesday night on PBS stations across the country, doesn’t really break new ground on the subject. But it is important nonetheless.One reason is that families, who make most of the decisions about assisted living, don’t pore over gerontology journals or state regulations as they are looking for a place that is not a nursing home.

So they don’t always realize that these reassuring-looking residences may have no nurse on the premises most of the time, that health care in assisted living frequently consists of a 911 call, that the average length of stay — according to the Assisted Living Federation of America — is less than two years.

Canada’s elderly at high risk of suicide, can’t afford mental health care: experts | The Lethbridge Herald – myLH.ca

Canada’s elderly at high risk of suicide, can’t afford mental health care: experts | The Lethbridge Herald – myLH.ca

TORONTO – Studies show that Canada’s elderly are at a much higher risk of suicide than adolescents, and there is growing concern among mental health experts that psychological care may be out of reach for most seniors.

Dr. Marnin Heisel, a clinical psychologist and professor at the University of Western Ontario, says lack of public awareness of the issue is a key problem that affects not only the elderly, but their families and the public in general.

Although this article reports on the problem in Canada, depression among older adults is by no means confined to that country.

As pointed out here, there is a need for public awareness about the issue of older adults and depression. Family and friends should be aware of what signs to look for and should not hesitate to discuss the issue with older friends and family members.

One interesting point here is the observation that suicide might sometimes pass for death by natural causes in this age group unless coroners, alerted by reports of depression, know to look specifically for signs of suicide on autopsy.