Last Week’s Links

The Future Is Knit: Why the Ancient Art of Knitting Is High-Tech Again

I never learned to knit, but those of you who did might be interested in how new technology is advancing this age-old form of producing clothing.

When you think about knitting, you might picture grandmas clicking big wooden needles or something wintery, like a snow-covered lodge. But knitting is everywhere, producing just about everything you put against your skin each day, from socks and t-shirts to hoodies and beanies. And thousands of years after it was first invented, new kinds of knitting are poised to fundamentally change how we think about these “basics,” making our bodies more connected than ever to the computerized world we live in.

Here’s a Handy Way to Understand Healthy Serving Sizes

Just exactly how big is one serving of pasta or sirloin steak?

Overlooked No More: Fannie Farmer, Modern Cookery’s Pioneer

Don’t we all remember The Fannie Farmer Cookbook?

She brought a scientific approach to cooking, taught countless women marketable skills and wrote a cookbook that defined American food for the 20th century.

Widely credited with inventing the modern recipe, Farmer was the first professional cook to insist that scientific methods and precise measurements — level teaspoons, cups and ounces — produce better food, and also the first to demonstrate that cooking classes could be mass-market entertainment.

© 2018 by Mary Daniels Brown