San Juan, Puerto Rico

We arrived in Miami and boarded our ship on Wednesday, January 3. The ship departed from Miami at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday. After spending Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at sea, today we docked at San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Originally settled by the Spanish, the area is heavily Catholic. It was named San Juan in honor of St. John the Baptist. Today, January 6, in the Christian calendar is Epiphany, the day when the birth of Christ was revealed to the three kings. In San Juan, the day is a holiday known as Three Kings Day. Our guide said, “Here in Puerto Rico, we celebrate Christmas longer than just about anyone else in the world.” He said that their celebration would end in a couple of weeks. Sure enough, later we were in a store and heard “I’m Dreaming of a White Christmas” playing.

On our two-hour walking tour of Old San Juan we visited a fort that’s a San Juan National Historic Site maintained by the U.S. Department of the Interior.

(Click on any image to see a larger version.)

This historic site flies three flags: the Burgundy cross (symbol of the Spanish empire when San Juan was settled, the flag of Puerto Rico, and the U.S. flag.

Many of the streets in Old San Juan are paved with blue stones that served as ballast in the Spanish galleons that brought goods and settlers to the region.

We all had to grab our hats to keep from losing them in the strong wind. When someone commented on the wind, our guide said, “Yes, it’s windy. These are the trade winds that powered ships across the Atlantic.”

Not far from our ship lay a replica of the Santa Maria, the largest of Columbus’s three ships.

San Juan, Puerto Rico

Christopher Columbus holds a place of honor in Old San Juan’s center:

The beautiful Viking Sun docked in Old San Juan (please ignore the Carnival logo in the background):

© 2019 by Mary Daniels Brown

Please Pardon My Absence

My husband and I will be traveling internationally until mid May 2019. During that time our internet access will be limited and SLOW. I’ll try to post periodically, but new posts will probably be few and far between.

However, I will try to catch up by publishing back-dated posts after we get home in late May. I hope you’ll check for new posts periodically but won’t give up if you don’t see anything new for a while.

Thanks for your understanding and patience.

Last Week’s Links

20 DEBUT WORKS OF FICTION BY WOMEN OVER 40

It’s not unusual to come across lists of young writers, particularly young women writers. While these lists showcase young people’s achievements, where are the opportunities for older people, particularly older women who may have had to postpone undertaking a writing career while focusing on the more traditional expectations for women: caring for a home and children?

But, according to Jenny Bhatt:

there are also many successful examples to serve as role models and provide ongoing inspiration for older writers—or aspiring writers of any age.

Below is a list of women writers who debuted works of fiction at or after the age of 40 and went on to achieve even more success. While not exhaustive, it shows clearly that women writers are not past their prime after a certain age. In fact, many are not even “late-bloomers”—they have simply deferred publishing due to family or career commitments. But the most striking aspect that unites all of these works is how each incorporates the collected, distilled wisdom, a lifetime of reading, and the sheer radicalism that could not have been possible for a younger writer.

Enjoy Bhatt’s list, which includes the following authors:

  • Penelope Fitzgerald, age 60
  • Mary Wesley, 71
  • Harriet Doerr, 74

How To Stay Together For 50 Years

This week on Refinery29, we’re filling your screens and consciousness with inspiring women over 50. Why? Because living in a culture obsessed with youth is exhausting for everyone. Ageing is a privilege, not something to dread.

In this article Amelia Abraham writes, “When I think about all the relationships I’ve had that fizzled out around the one-year mark, I wonder whether I could even go the distance of five years, let alone 50.” She meets with three couples to discover their secrets for staying together for 50 years. Meet these couples:

  • Jill and Michael, married for 57 years
  • Ron and Ellen, married for 63 years
  • Isabell and Ronnie, married for 57 years

Their secrets for achieving a long marriage include hard work, forgiveness, keeping romance alive, never walking away from an argument, and making a decision and sticking with it.

THE CHEERFUL SINNERS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST’S WILDEST PORT CITY

In case you missed this tidbit about me, we retired to Tacoma, WA, from St. Louis about five years ago. We love the Pacific Northwest, and one of our favorite activities is exploring new areas. We’ve visited Port Townsend, WA, several times and knew that it has a salty nautical heritage, so this article caught my eye.

Enjoy reading about the colorful history of Port Townsend, including its part in creating the phrase “to get Shanghaied.”

How to Take Charge of Your Medical Care

My mother was of a generation that thought of doctors as gods. She trusted doctors completely and did whatever they told her to do. When I once asked her what medications she was taking and what they were for, she had no idea.

But most people today take a more active approach to their health care (I hope). This article provides good advice for doing just that.

The best time to start taking charge of your medical care is when you’re not facing an emergency, and the article begins with a section on what to do when you’re healthy. It continues with sections about seeing a medical professional, being admitted to a hospital, returning home after hospitalization, and advocating for others.

Why Doctors Hate Their Computers

Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient; instead, doctors feel trapped behind their screens.

Dr. Atul Gawande, a surgeon and public-health researcher, reports on a seeming contradiction:

Something’s gone terribly wrong. Doctors are among the most technology-avid people in society; computerization has simplified tasks in many industries. Yet somehow we’ve reached a point where people in the medical profession actively, viscerally, volubly hate their computers.

Gawande uses his own experience with learning a new computer software program for medical records as a springboard to address the issue of how computerization affects the way people interact with each other. He writes:

Medicine is a complex adaptive system: it is made up of many interconnected, multilayered parts, and it is meant to evolve with time and changing conditions. Software is not. It is complex, but it does not adapt. That is the heart of the problem for its users, us humans.

This is a long article, but it treats in depth the question of how humans interact with each other as well as with technology.

 

© 2018 by Mary Daniels Brown

U.S. Citizens: Please Vote!

Here in Washington State, USA, we vote by mail or by dropping our ballot into one of many collection boxes. I voted yesterday. If you haven’t yet voted, please get out there and do it.

This year, voting is not merely a civic duty; it’s a moral imperative.

Introducing a New Category: Older Adults in Literature

In my other life I blog about books. One of my particular interests there is how literature reflects the culture that produces it.

When I put together a list of 5 Novels That Feature Older Adult Characters for the post International Day of Older Persons on this blog, I realized that the topic of how older adults are portrayed in literature is appropriate for both sides of my life and deserves to be its own category. I’ll be cross-posting more such lists and book reviews on both blogs from time to time.

© 2018 by Mary Daniels Brown

Aretha Franklin, the ‘Queen of Soul,’ Dies at 76 – The New York Times

Many of us grew up listening to her sing. This article links to a playlist of 20 essential Aretha Franklin songs.